Malware

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Training Modules Duration: 17:01 Minutes
Malware
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Transcript

Slide 1

This security awareness training addresses malicious software, or “malware”.

Malware is the short form of “malicious software,” and is often called a “virus.” As the name implies, malware is dangerous software that uses your computer, mobile device, or other technology to attack you, other people and other systems.

Hackers use malware to steal money, identities, and confidential information. Hackers use malware to destroy and manipulate computers and computer-controlled equipment. Malware is used to launch attacks or infect other systems.

Slide 2

Over the next few minutes, you will learn the threat posed by malware, and how to prevent it by avoiding installation, using antivirus software, and frequently updating your technology.

In recent years, malware has been used to steal millions of passwords, credit cards, bank credentials, health records, and sensitive documents. Malware has also been used to destroy computers, phones, industrial machinery, and scientific equipment. Malware has been known to reproduce itself through email, websites, or other means. The associated cost of the related theft, damage, and containment easily extend into the tens of billions.

In our first malware exercise, you will play the part of a hacker. Select technology that could be infected with malware, then click submit.

That’s right! Phones, routers, tablets, computers, servers, and even smart appliances run software that can be infected. Click anywhere to continue.

Sorry, but that’s incorrect. Don’t forget that phones, routers and even smart appliances run software that can be infected. Click reset to clear your choices and try again.

Slide 3

Malware can be found in many types of files and software, including Microsoft Office documents, Zip files, installation programs, and add-ons. Malware can also travel through some online videos and games and is sometimes even distributed through “lost” thumb drives or CDs planted by hackers.

In all cases, your best defense against malware is to be suspicious of any incoming file. You should never open files from people who you do not know, files that arrive unexpectedly, or files that look unusual.

You should also never simply insert CDs or USB drives you find into your computer; instead, give those devices to a qualified IT expert for inspection.

Avoiding suspicious files will prevent many malware infections, but you can also set up a second line of defense by using antivirus software, often just called “antivirus.” Antivirus looks for known malware in files and applications before they run or are opened. When it finds malware, antivirus will automatically delete the threat and will usually notify you or your IT department.

Slide 4

Despite its power, antivirus alone is not a perfect defense because it can only prevent malware that it understands, and it is not available for every computer and device. However, antivirus is available for popular operating systems like Windows, iOS, Linux, and Android.

In this exercise, select technology that can be protected with antivirus.

That’s right!

Antivirus is generally available for computers, phones, and tablets, but not routers or smart appliances.

Try Again!

Antivirus is generally available for computers, phones, and tablets, but not routers or smart appliances.

Slide 5

Malware often exploits old security defects in existing technology to install itself or cause harm. However, you can often protect yourself by updating your technology frequently. Small, low-risk updates that mainly fix defects are called “patches,” and many popular operating systems and applications now automatically patch themselves every few days. Whether performed manually or automatically, frequent patch updates will help keep you safe from malware.

Slide 6

Some hackers try to fool you into installing their malware by calling it an update. When you update your technology, always be sure you are getting an official version from your official provider.

Downloading from vendor support sites and turning on automatic application updates are two ways to ensure you only install official updates.

Be especially careful of websites and pop-ups that tell you to download and install an update now. These sites often use an unofficial update to infect your computer with malware.

Slide 7

Over the past few minutes, you learned about the threat posed by malware, and how to prevent it by avoiding installation, using antivirus software, and frequently updating your technology. Please review or print these takeaways, and then click continue to complete the module.

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